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U.S. Army Inspections: Barracks Inspection

The third article in the inspection series covers techniques and guidelines for conducting barracks inspections. Frequent barracks inspections provide leaders the ability to monitor the health and welfare of their Soldiers. Many Soldiers feel this inspection is unfair as they are subject to more inspections than the Soldiers who live off-post or in post quarters. To some degree this is understandable but Soldiers must also understand that unit leadership is directly responsible for helping to maintain the barracks and therefore must actively check the barrack to ensure proper maintenance is being conducted and that Soldiers are taking care of the barracks.

Squad leaders should be checking the barrack on an informal basis 2-3 times a week. The platoon sergeant should be conducting an informal check weekly along with the First Sergeant. These checks should include spot checking rooms for cleanliness/neatness, physical security compliance, equipment failures, and maintenance issues.

posted on 08/17/2011 under Articles
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Mark is a Retired Command Sergeant Major with 26 years of military leadership experience. He held 3 military occupational specialties (Field Artillery, Nuclear Weapons Tech, and Ammunition Ordnance). Mark is one of the leading military authors in the fields of leadership, counseling, and training..

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    Comments

  • Anonymous

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    Can nco’s make Their own barracks room standards?

    • Mark Gerecht

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      Bottomline
      Leaders, can add to standards but their standards must be fair and reasonable and not designed to place unnecessary hardship on the Soldier.

      Discussion
      Is this a battle you really want to fight?  If so put your ducks in a row. Consider the following:

      Do your homework
      Research the regulations and the barracks SOP
      Speak professionally, directly and factually to the leader
      If that does not work take it up the chain.
      Follow up:
      Does the Leader change how the treat you?
      If so you need to also consider how you will respond to this issue
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      Hope this helps! Did you find this information useful? We Appreciate your feedback!

      Please Read!
      Help Us Help please tell your peers, subordinates, and superiors. Also we are always looking for examples, classes, briefings, SOPs, templates and other information we can share for free in the ASKTOP.net Armsroom. Please help us help others by sending your ARMS ROOM stuff to: mark.gerecht@mentorinc.us

      This response is based on the information you provide. My comments do not represent the US Army or US government positions. Furthermore my comments should be used for information purposes only.

      Respectfully

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  • Anonymous

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    housing soldiers on or off post never get inspected but barracks soldiers get it every morning plus inspections regardless of soldier being in attendance despite every other soldier being there for theirs. (not exaggeration)how does this come even remotely close to being equal treatment? while im on the topic of equal treatment why can a housing soldier practically run a bar out of their home but a barracks soldier is allowed only one six pack of beer OR one 750 ml bottle of liqueur OR one 750 ml bottle of wine? it seems counter productive to me since many soldiers are stupid enough to drink their six pack then drive to the store and buy another or just ignore the rule

    • Mark Gerecht

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      There are definitely situations as you describe. Sometimes all it takes is a clam, factual, professional discussion with a senior member of the chain of command to fix an issue. I have seen several dumb policies corrected when a Soldier spoke up and could support their argument. The chain of command can take no action if they don’t know the problem exist.
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      If you think this site is useful, follow us, and sign up for our newsletter
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      Feedback

      Hope this helps! Did you find this information useful? We Appreciate your feedback!

      Please Read!

      Help Us Help please tell your peers, subordinates, and superiors. Also we are always looking for examples, classes, briefings, SOPs, templates and other information we can share for free in the ASKTOP.net Armsroom. Please help us help others by sending your ARMS ROOM stuff to: mark.gerecht@mentorinc.us

      This response is based on the information you provide. My comments do not represent the US Army or US government positions. Furthermore my comments should be used for information purposes only.

      Respectfully
      TOP

  • Chey

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    Can an NCO go through your drawers during a room inspection? If not what regulation says so?

  • rag'nar lothbrook

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    im am just wondering what is the guide line or anything for the matter for a E-5 doing room inspections. i was told to open my cloest which was locked and my sgt had no reason for me open but to. i have stuff in there that they play with and mess around with. Im am wondering can i be told to open and/or forced to open by said E-5 or 1sgt when there is no reason for e open it? because my stuff us always clean, and orginazted. so can some tell me the FM or whatever where i can find it and so i can tactfully show my sgt?

  • Josh

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    Hi, while we were out in the field, our command informed us that our rooms were inspected. when we returned, I found some of my personal items moved and my drawers were switched around. Then I realized that knife was gone, I had it stored in my drawer out of sight. It was very apparent that whoever inspected my room, went through my belongings. Is this allowed?

  • Austin

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    I have a personal lock on my closet. Are my NCO’s allowed to make me open my lock and closet during an informal inspection? The only thing I have concrete is my SOP states that NCO support channel are only allowed to perform informal walkthroughs. It’s not that I have anything to hide, but I have items of a personal nature I would prefer not seen.

    • Mark Gerecht

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      Austin check out Eck’s Response to a similiar question on 5/31/2013. Basically they can check anything in open view. Now the other way to look at is should you really fight this? Just need to choose your battles. I understand the frustration.
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